Monday, March 31, 2014 - 2:06pm
Author: Bill Miller

Readers of this blog are no strangers to the versatility of the balaclava. It’s recognized as a do-it-all, cold weather garment that can be worn as a stocking cap, a neck gaiter, a facemask, or in any combination of or all of the above. A balaclava even works great underneath a beanie style hat if things get really cold. Or you can wear it under your favorite camouflage ball cap – even if it’s just to wear your beat up old “lucky huntin’ hat” to boost your confidence – that’s important, too.

Monday, March 24, 2014 - 4:39pm
Author: Bill Miller

It’s often said that if turkeys had a sense of smell, we’d probably never shoot one. The birds are that wary. Think about it. If there were dozens of predators – both furred and feathered – trying to make a meal out of you from the second your beak poked through your eggshell, you’d be a wary critter, too.

Monday, March 17, 2014 - 4:37pm
Author: Bill Miller

As I recently shared, my daydreams of turkey hunting generally don’t include snow. Hunting spring gobblers is supposed to be done when it’s green, getting warm, and there’s a chance of finding morels, too. Yet in reality, my turkey hunts sometimes include snow and cold.

Wednesday, March 5, 2014 - 2:12pm
Author: Bill Miller

Wisconsin’s Horicon Marsh is famous. Decades ago, when everyone thought truly giant Canada geese were only a legend conjured up by some old guys in a duck camp somewhere, Horicon continued to maintain … and hunt … a healthy population of these birds. All of today’s nuisance “golf course” geese are descendants of the Horicon geese and those discovered on Silver Lake in Rochester, Minnesota.

Monday, February 17, 2014 - 5:34pm
Author: Bill Miller

One of my favorite hunting companions of all-time is a woman I consider my “adopted” sister. Some of the greatest hunts I suspect I’ll ever enjoy were in the company of Dawn Charging. She was born and raised on the prairies of North Dakota.

One of the most memorable hunts Dawn and I shared was on a windy afternoon. We’d hunted a field spread for geese in the morning, and after a pot of coffee and a one-skillet brunch Dawn needed to get some work done, so I took a spin around the neighborhood to scout and maybe find a pheasant or a couple of sharps.

Monday, February 10, 2014 - 5:36pm
Author: Bill Miller

The line from the poem “Night Before Christmas” that always strikes me is: “The moon on the crest of the new fallen snow gave the luster of midday to objects below.” While for most folks it’s just setting the scene for the arrival of Santa Claus, when I heard that line, even as a youngster, it always set my thoughts wandering. “Hmmmm. Fresh snow? A clear, full-moon night? I’ll bet the coyotes are on the move.”

Monday, February 3, 2014 - 5:34pm
Author: Bill Miller

The alarm clock on the nightstand jingles, and I reach over to turn it off. Setting it would have been unnecessary because I’ve been awake for an hour already. That’s just the way it is when I know the morning’s agenda is, “1. Hunting, 2. Hunting, 3. Hunting, 4. Lunch.”

Monday, January 27, 2014 - 10:53pm
Author: Bill Miller

Despite cutting edge technological developments in fabrics, insulations, and what I call “grippiness” of gloves, there are times and activities that nearly always demand bare hands.

Think I’m wrong? Well, just check with the vast majority of NFL quarterbacks except, perhaps, a scant few like Kurt Warner or Peyton Manning (sometimes).

Monday, January 20, 2014 - 10:51am
Author: Bill Miller

For the moments of truth in hunting, we must practice. Practice often. Practice thoughtfully. Practice real.

It doesn’t matter whether it’s bow hunting or rifle hunting for big game or wingshooting for waterfowl or upland birds. The more we practice, the better we’ll perform.

Monday, January 13, 2014 - 11:08pm
Author: Bill Miller

The career of an outdoor writer is blessed with opportunities to try out the latest and greatest hunting gear each fall. There’s always something new in guns, ammo, optics, clothing, etc. that needs to be tested and written about. Yet, there are many hunts on which I wish I could use old, tried and true gear. Those antiques left to me by my father offer a personal connection to him. It was Dad who really made me the hunter I am today.